How Tomorrow Moves

11694869_948986195154972_6787796154688612345_n

It was a matter of helium-speak, and tomorrow-talk, and bright ribbons of noise amounting to nothing.
We, hanging out on the street-corner, conducting ping-pong volleys and raps, ferocity and verve, building ourselves up—who we were and were not, what we would do or had already done. We erected fragile monuments to ourselves, and asked others to pay their respects, perhaps even worship the idols we had carved out of thin air.
Yet, in knowing one another’s monuments to be false, and plastered with shit, we tore each other down, behind shoulders, glances, sarcastic jabs and cuts.
Danny Dazer, who you kidding, you’re not moving to Florida to work at Club Med and screw a new babe every night.
And Mike Chichamimo, we all know there is no hot girlfriend who lives in Staten Island, which is why we never see her, right, but she is real with big tits and a tongue she can’t keep out of your mouth.
We talked big because that was the racket, because we were kids on a street-corner, emotional asthmatics stealing helium from the lungs and lives of others, prospectors mining for hot air.
Tomorrow, yes, tomorrow was our ally, and we charted its petty course, full of sound and fury, our tongues turning tricks and teasing value, out of nothing at all.

 

Advertisements

About John Biscello

Originally from Brooklyn, NY, writer, poet, spoken word performer, and playwright, John Biscello now lives in Taos, New Mexico. He is the author of two novels: Broken Land, a Brooklyn Tale and Raking the Dust, and a collection of stories, Freeze Tag. His fiction and poetry has appeared in: Art Times, nthposition, The Wanderlust Review, Ophelia Street, Caper, Polyphony, Dilate, Militant Roger, Chokecherries, Farmhouse, BENT, The 555 Collective, Instigator, Brass Sopaipilla, The Iconoclast, Adobe Walls, Kansas City Voices, and the Tishman Review. His blog--Notes of an Urban Stray--can be read at johnbiscello.blogspot.com. Broken Land, a Brooklyn Tale was named Underground Book Reviews 2014 Book of the Year.
This entry was posted in Prose and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s