Dirty Dancing in the Dark

walker
   Brooklyn, the Walker Theater, 1987.
   I am twelve and precariously balancing on the shoulders of Fat Brian.
   Come on, you’re not getting any lighter, Fat Brian shouts.
   I reach up and lock my fingers around the bottom rung of the fire escape ladder, then hoist myself up.  I scale the ladder until I reach the landing and there I wait for the others to join me.  The others are Jay and Petey and Danny.  They all climb aboard Fat Brian’s shoulders and scale the ladder to the landing.  Since none of our shoulders are broad and sturdy enough to hold up Fat Brian, he is always the shoulder-man.  Me and Jay and Danny and Petey will sneak through the unlocked side-door leading into the second-floor theater.  We chip in so Fat Brian can buy a ticket from the box office and meet us in the theater.
   We never know what film will be playing in the second floor theater, and we always pray that it isn’t a love story or a movie with a lot of talking.  What we want is blood and violence and action.  Or to have the shit scared out of us.  Yet no matter what film is playing, we’ll stay and watch it.
   We’d rather watch a movie, any movie, then not watch a movie.  We’d rather be in the dark, even if it meant being in the dark with sappy characters that kissed and spoke cheesy lines that upset our stomachs, then to not be in the dark.
   We take our seats in the theater, and five minutes later Fat Brian joins us, holding a large popcorn and large Coke.
   The movie playing is Dirty Dancing.  We bitch and we moan about it, but we watch the film the whole way through.  Afterwards, we briefly talk about the film, wondering if girls would like us more or like us less if we could dance like Patrick Swayze.
Advertisements

About John Biscello

Originally from Brooklyn, NY, writer, poet, spoken word performer, and playwright, John Biscello now lives in Taos, New Mexico. He is the author of two novels: Broken Land, a Brooklyn Tale and Raking the Dust, and a collection of stories, Freeze Tag. His fiction and poetry has appeared in: Art Times, nthposition, The Wanderlust Review, Ophelia Street, Caper, Polyphony, Dilate, Militant Roger, Chokecherries, Farmhouse, BENT, The 555 Collective, Instigator, Brass Sopaipilla, The Iconoclast, Adobe Walls, Kansas City Voices, and the Tishman Review. His blog--Notes of an Urban Stray--can be read at johnbiscello.blogspot.com. Broken Land, a Brooklyn Tale was named Underground Book Reviews 2014 Book of the Year.
This entry was posted in Prose and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s