In Praise of Dark and Light

Everyone’s dark
is coming up
and it isn’t going to be pretty,
as well it shouldn’t be.
Beauty, as a rugged force,
as thorny swaths of dream-thistles,
blooms through night-fasting,
and respiring enclosures of dark.
Beauty
marks the hidden faith
of the smallest hours,
of gongs
and nocturnes tolled.
Everyone’s dark,
ribbed and torn,
is coming up,
for far too long
too many hearts, quivering
and clamped,
were held in locked jaws,
too many tongues
bitten down on repeatedly,
words, martyred to pink,
drowned in spitless blood,
a gag order bonded
to shame’s conditions.
All those Orphic songs,
unsung, hemmed between
dusty, hidden margins,
they are coming up,
neo-goth, angel-punk, dream-folk,
savagely sunned yawps,
and as tenderest shoots
baring for glean, they will need love,
lots and lots of love.
Everyone’s Ophelia,
rebirthing into moon-haunted
witches, no longer
pale whispers of shackled waifs,
no longer the mirror image
of some man’s drowned double
fantasy-girl,
pearlescently preserved
in grave, brackish water,
 no, all the Ophelias
are reforming to mount wolves
aimed, with furious love,
at the molten center
of the heart
of a brand-new dawn,
a claim unbridled.
Everyone’s dark
is rising
and what that means
will be different
for each person.
Yet the heart,
fathomless
in its storied and ancient infancy,
understands clearly
that dark, ceded to light,
finds its own level,
heavening its roots
in fertile ground,
growing lucid
 through unfettered praises.
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About John Biscello

Originally from Brooklyn, NY, writer, poet, spoken word performer, and playwright, John Biscello now lives in Taos, New Mexico. He is the author of two novels: Broken Land, a Brooklyn Tale and Raking the Dust, and a collection of stories, Freeze Tag. His fiction and poetry has appeared in: Art Times, nthposition, The Wanderlust Review, Ophelia Street, Caper, Polyphony, Dilate, Militant Roger, Chokecherries, Farmhouse, BENT, The 555 Collective, Instigator, Brass Sopaipilla, The Iconoclast, Adobe Walls, Kansas City Voices, and the Tishman Review. His blog--Notes of an Urban Stray--can be read at johnbiscello.blogspot.com. Broken Land, a Brooklyn Tale was named Underground Book Reviews 2014 Book of the Year.
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